SMACC Kicks Off Summertime Dance Party at the AWS Warehouse - Part Deux

Hi Everyone,
I had to start a new thread, since the 30 day timeline closed the original thread… Annoying.

Anyways, here’s the third video of our SMACC’s summer dance series…

SMACC2 sm_dance_bot_warehouse

And here is a link just in case the link embedded in the image above doesn’t work.

Source code for this example can be found here



Then, continuing in reverse order, here is the 2nd demo…

SMACC2 sm_dance_bot_warehouse


And here is a link just in case the link embedded in the image above doesn’t work.

Source code for this example can be found here


And then of course, our first demo...

SMACC2 sm_dance_bot_warehouse


And here is a link just in case the link embedded in the image above doesn’t work.

Source code for this example can be found here




And here is the link to the original thread…
https://discourse.ros.org/t/smacc-kicks-off-summertime-dance-party-at-the-aws-warehouse/25934

Farewell Summer of 22…
Cheers,

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Perhaps you can provide a description of what y’all did for the most recent video. What was added?

Hi @Lyle,
Thank you for the question.

I don’t know if I would say that anything was added for the third demo that wasn’t in place for the earlier ones. But I think the significance of the videos is that they show an almost complete domination of the 2D space inside this particular simulation environment.

And from a high level view, we were able to do that with basically two tools. First, we used SMACC to chop up our problems into little bits, with individual states, and then we mixed and matched the reuseable behaviors found in SMACC’s Nav2 client.

See here for our current list of reuseable client behaviors…

And with these tools, developers can easily and rapidly develop their applications, while also knowing that as their application grows over time, SMACC can handle it. “It” meaning that you can add more states, more levels of hierarchy, more orthogonals, and more client behaviors, without SMACC breaking. So that you can make that robot do whatever you want it to do.

I’m hoping that ROS developers start using the state machines shown in the videos here as their starting point for application development. Simply copying and renaming the state machines before starting to hack away on them and make them their own.

Cheers,

In this demo it is shown how you can combine the SMACC built-in navigation behaviors with a custom asynchronous control behavior for your mobile base.

For example, in this demo we have a new behavior that is called CbPureSpinning. That behavior performs basically a PID control algorithm in the yaw variable to make the robot spin some angle delta. This behavior is fully described in a single class (so it is easy to understand and reuse) and runs asynchronously inside SMACC in its own thread and that directly interacts with /cmd_vel and /tf (via other SMACC built in components)

Notice in contrast, that SMACC built-in navigation behaviors essentially make requests to the remote nav2 stack.

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